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Flu Vaccinations: Your First Line of Defense
Home > Community > Community Health & Wellness > Flu Season: What You Need to Know > Flu Vaccinations: Your First Line of Defense
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Flu Vaccinations: Your First Line of Defense

If you don't have the flu, it's not too late to get your flu shot. If you haven't already been vaccinated, we strongly encourage you to get a flu shot as soon as possible.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), everyone who is at least six months of age should get a flu vaccine this season. For some people, the flu shot is particularly important. The CDC includes in this category:

  • People who have certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and chronic lung disease.
  • Pregnant women
  • People 65 years and older
  • People who live with or care for others who are high risk of developing serious complications. This includes household contacts and caregivers of people with certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and chronic lung disease.

It's easy to get your flu shot at:  

  • Your local pharmacy. Many pharmacies now offer the flu vaccine. Note too, that under the Affordable Care Act, with a few exceptions, most insurance plans will allow you to receive a flu vaccine with no copay or deductible. Check with your insurance provider for details.
  • Montefiore's Geriatric Home Visiting Program. If you are physically frail, have difficulty with walking or travel, or have memory problems can benefit from our Geriatric Home Visiting Program. Our team provides comprehensive healthcare services to senior patients in the privacy of their homes, including flu shots. You or a family member can also call 1-866-MED-TALK (1-866-633-8255) and request a flu shot by making an appointment with a member of our team.

In addition to getting vaccinated, everyone should take simple, common sense steps to prevent the spread

  • Cover your nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze – even consider coughing into your elbow to reduce the spread of germs from your hand.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • When sick, stay home and limit contact with other people.