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April 30, 2018

MONTEFIORE CELEBRATES NATIONAL NURSES WEEK

National Nurses Week 2018

"I CHOSE THE THEME OF COMMUNITY QUILTING BECAUSE IT CARRIES A HISTORY OF CAREGIVING THROUGH ACTION. SYMBOLICALLY, QUILTING AND THE PATTERNS WITHIN QUILTS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH WARMTH, LOVE AND COMFORT." —Teaching Artist Samantha Nye, describing the Montefiore Nurses Painted Quilt Project

During the week of May 6–12, nurses across the country will be honored during National Nurses Week. This year's theme, Nurses: Inspire, Innovate, Influence, perfectly describes what Montefiore nurses do every day. "Montefiore nurses are at the forefront of healthcare innovations, and through their practice, they are able to influence the way our patients experience their healthcare and inspire the delivery of the highest level of care," says Maureen Scanlan, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, Vice President, Nursing and Patient Care Services, Montefiore. "During Nurses Week, we acknowledge the hard work that they do all year long."

Montefiore nurses will be offered a variety of treats, including massages, special breakfasts and lunches, ice cream carts and more. The Department will partner with Healing Arts to provide an array of activities before and during Nurses Week, to give nurses an opportunity to relax, bond and participate in projects such as this year's "painted quilt" led by Teaching Artist Samantha Nye. With contributions from nurses in every unit of the medical center, the finished project will be displayed during Nurses Week at various campuses. Mid-week, a number of awards for excellence will be presented, including the Professional Practice Awards and the Joan Bilder Award, the highest award for nursing excellence at Montefiore.

Visit the intranet after May 3 to view a calendar of Nurses Week events.

Selections from the “quilt” painting sessions.

CHAM BRINGS TIGER CLINIC TO HUTCHINSON CAMPUS

Montefiore Hutchinson Campus

Montefiore Hutchinson Campus

The Total Integrated Genitourinary Endocrine Reproductive clinic, known as TIGER, was recently opened by Children's Hospital at Montefiore (CHAM). TIGER specialists collaborate to manage treatment of children with ambiguous genitalia and other disorders/ differences of sex development, such as Turner and Klinefelter syndromes. The clinic assists children and their parents in navigating the process of evaluation and treatment for these disorders. Services include genetic testing and counseling, laboratory testing and imaging, hormonal therapy, surgical reconstruction and psychosocial support. "We know that providing the proper psychosocial support in addition to medical treatments is crucial in delivering the best possible care," says Kristina Derrick, MD, ScM, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics – Endocrinology and Diabetes, Montefiore. The program is staffed by specialists from Pediatric Endocrinology, Pediatric Urology, Genetics and Pediatric Psychology, and also consults with reproductive specialists on fertility concerns. The TIGER clinic offers both one-time consultation and long-term management of patients, and physicians coordinate care with the patient's primary physician or specialist. The clinic is open on the first Friday of every month at Montefiore's Hutchinson Campus, 1250 Waters Place, Tower 2, 11th floor. To make a referral, contact Kristina Derrick, MD, at 718-920-4664 or kderrick@montefiore.org.

BOOMERANG BACK TO A YOUTHFUL APPEARANCE

Dr. Tepper at the Aesthetic Surgery Hutchinson Campus offices.

Dr. Tepper at the Aesthetic Surgery Hutchinson Campus offices.

Montefiore's aesthetic surgeons have developed an incision-free procedure that brings back a more youthful appearance. In this procedure, called the "Boomerang Lift," fat cells are injected into the space between the eye and the cheek, an area that can appear sunken with age. Fat is injected in a boomerang shape, giving the procedure its name. This innovative procedure was recently published in the prestigious journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Oren Tepper, MD, Director, Aesthetic Surgery; Director, Craniofacial Surgery; and Assistant Professor, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Montefiore and Einstein, the study's author, and his team utilize 3-D imaging to visualize and map the precise amount of fat added to the face to yield optimal results. "Previously, there wasn't quality data that illustrated how much fat to inject to get the desired effect, so this study added to the body of knowledge in performing this innovative procedure," says Dr. Tepper.

Visit the Montefiore Aesthetics website to learn about our innovative offerings: www.montefiore.org/aesthetics-procedures.


NEWS

MONTEFIORE HEADLINES AND HIGHLIGHTS 2017

MONTEFIORE HEADLINES

The year 2017 was one of Montefiore milestones and patient stories that tugged at our heartstrings. Spend five minutes watching some of our memorable moments—view the 2017 Highlight Reel on the Public Relations intranet page. It's easy to share your team's research and patient stories with Public Relations! Contact the Public Relations team at 718-920-4011 to learn more.


EXPLAINERS TO THE RESCUE

When a child has a complex medical condition requiring multiple medical devices at the bedside, it can be intimidating for patients and families. That's where the Explainers come to the rescue. These high school and college students from the Bronx and surrounding areas participate in The Carl Sagan Discover/Explainer Program at Children's Hospital at Montefiore (CHAM). During visits with patients and their families, they familiarize them with the bedside interactive patient care system for healthcare education, entertainment and patient experience needs. At the same time, Explainers gain experience in a professional healthcare environment and receive professional development advice, such as resume writing, interview coaching and career placement opportunities. "The program provides students the opportunity to learn about healthcare and work with patients, so they can experience firsthand what it's like to work in the healthcare field," says Meghan D. Kelly, MSEd, CCLS, Director, Phoebe H. Stein Child Life Program, who oversees the Explainer Program. More than 100 Explainers have participated since the program's inception in 2001, with many going on to pursue fulfilling careers in the healthcare industry.


NEW FACES NEW ROLES
GET TO KNOW MONTEFIORE'S NEWEST LEADERS

Daphne T. Hsu, MD,
Interim Chair, Pediatrics;
Physician-in-Chief, CHAM

Lauren Shapiro, MD,
Residency Director, Internal Medicine

Joshua Stern, MD,
Director, Endourology & Kidney Stone Clinic,
Urology


RESEARCH & INNOVATION

Montefiore psychiatry residents

Montefiore psychiatry residents standing in front of the Church Center for the United Nations prior to presenting their work on intimate partner violence. From left to right: Anna Huh, MD; Ehren Ekhause, MD; Alexandra Baluna, MD; and Suzanna Chen, MD.

Four Montefiore psychiatry residents presented a lecture on Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) to representatives of NGOs from all over the world, working with the American Psychological Association APA-NGO and Vivian Pender, MD, a distinguished APA life fellow and United Nations psychiatric consultant. The residents collaborated with Mayumi Okuda Benavides, MD, from NewYork- Presbyterian, who has been working with the APA, to develop a toolkit to help doctors manage IPV. With her help, the psychiatry residents presented a comprehensive review of IPV, including definitions, epidemiology, medical and psychiatric consequences, economic impacts, prevention and policy recommendations, and best practice guidelines from the upcoming APA toolkit.

LINKING HEAD TRAUMA AND VISION DAMAGE

Ryan Gise, MD

Ryan Gise, MD

Montefiore's Ophthalmology Department, in collaboration with Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Jacobi Medical Center, conducts research on traumatic injuries that damage the visual nervous system—any part of the brain or nerves that affect vision. One study, Pediatric Visual Pathway Injuries, was presented at the annual North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society (NANOS) meeting and won the 2017 Fight For Sight-NANOS Research grant. The study reviewed data from the National Trauma Data Bank to identify types and causes of severe visual injuries. Another study, Firearms-Related Ocular Trauma in the United States, was presented at the American Academy of Ophthalmology Annual Meeting. It found firearms are a leading cause of sight-threatening ocular trauma and associated traumatic brain injury in the United States. Of the 235,254 firearms injuries recorded from 2008 to 2014, 3.7 percent involved the eyes. Though the majority of these 8,715 cases were white males from the South, a disproportionate 35 percent of victims were African Americans, who face greater odds of being assaulted on the street. These injuries can be debilitating, but often nonfatal, leaving patients in need of extensive rehabilitation. "Together these studies demonstrate the need for eye exams and ophthalmology involvement in the care of trauma patients," says Ryan Gise, MD, Chief Resident in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences.


CLINICAL RESEARCH

WOMEN’S HEALTH RESEARCH STUDY

Are you an HIV-negative woman between 18–49 years old who is interested in participating in a research study?

The study involves testing the safety of a vaginal gel in development to prevent HIV infection.

Study participation involves 10 visits to an outpatient clinical research center. Testing involves blood draws, STI testing, pelvic exams and biopsies. Reimbursement is offered.

If interested, please call or text Becky at 347-835-7842.

EVENT

2ND ANNUAL EINSTEIN-MONTEFIORE PRESIDENTIAL LECTURE

The Einstein-Montefiore Presidential Lecture highlights outstanding basic and clinical research being pursued at Einstein and Montefiore.

Join speakers William R. Jacobs, Jr., PhD, and Betsy Herold, MD, as we celebrate our partnership.

Tuesday, May 1 | 5:30–7:00 PM
Robbins Auditorium, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Parking is available.