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HOW DOES THE HAND DO WHAT IT DOES? IT’S COMPLICATED.

In a single hand there are:

  • 29 major and minor bones (many people have a few more)
  • 29 major joints
  • At least 123 named ligaments
  • 34 muscles which move the fingers and thumb
  • 48 named nerves
  • 30 named arteries

Needless to say the hand is very complex. So is the level of expertise required to care for it.

Our board-certified and fellowship-trained surgeons use both surgical and non-surgical techniques to provide comprehensive care for a broad array of acute and chronic conditions of the hand, wrist, forearm and elbow.

From babies with conjoined fingers to teenage athletes with broken bones to seniors suffering from osteoporosis we’re doing more to make sure our patients retain or regain optimum function of their hands.

TEAMS OF SPECIALISTS COLLABORATE TO OPTIMIZE TREATMENTS

TEAMS OF SPECIALISTS COLLABORATE TO OPTIMIZE TREATMENTS

Surgery plays an important role, but it’s just a step in the total treatment process.

To speed patients’ recovery and return to their regular lives, our surgeons collaborate directly with other specialists.

For example, at our Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, hand specialists and occupational therapists guide patients through custom tailored exercise programs.

We also work closely with the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery on reconstructions.

Testing and diagnosis of nerve injuries takes place at the Department of Neurology’s Electrodiagnostic Center.

Our comprehensive, coordinated approach to treatment ensures that you receive care you need, when you need it.

SHE’S ALWAYS THERE FOR OTHERS. WE WERE THERE FOR HER

SHE’S ALWAYS THERE FOR OTHERS. WE WERE THERE FOR HER.

Sister Cristina Bocanengradelgado has spent more than two-thirds of her 37 years helping others as a nursing assistant, a home care RN and of course, as a nun.

But Cristina needed some help of her own when the severe pain she had felt in both wrists for years became too much handle.

She went to see Dr. Roy Kulick who diagnosed bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. Shortly after, he performed surgery on her right hand. And then on her left, several months later.

Cristina’s recovery has been smooth and she’s back to the life she loves. Sewing and knitting in her spare time and helping others on a full-time basis.


THE HAND SURGERY TEAM